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and e.u. on exchange of information. we work very closely with canada and mexico, our two neighbors. and so there is a huge amount of interaction at the international level but all designed to minimize the risk that a terrorist could either enter the united states or be plotting somewhere else to injure u.s. interests. >> senator mueller. >> senator, we've realized for a number of years, certainly before my time, that our success is in large part dependent on working with our counterparts overseas. we have over 60 legal offices in embassies around the world which we use as liaisons to our counterparts. we have since the 1970's a national academy in which we've brought in state and local law enforcement for a 10-week period for training. we have for many years included our foreign counterparts, whether it be from iraq or pakistan or afghanistan as part of those classes in an effort to educate persons as to what the f.b.i. does but also how the f.b.i. does it and what we do not do. in those relatively small ways but i think important ways we have developed persons that provide the rel
companies using these, especially in canada. i was wondering, on the state legislative side, is there anything we can do as an industry to help them work in the state-to-state level with one voice versus going individually state to state to try to get regulations that are written? all the states and to be moving toward this, but that a written more in compliance with what the national regulations that are being proposed and actually being brought out? is there any way that we can help to work with the states on that? thank you. >> well, i am not as familiar with the exact regulations you're talking about so far as the technology and the school buses. but so far as, you know, working with state legislators, again, i give you the invitation to contact me and talk directly with me. ncsl, on a whole, does not develop model legislation for states to adopt because, you know, the one size does not fit all, and we want to make sure states have flexibility in the way they approach legislation in their state. but i would at least welcome a conversation with you if there's an opportuni
in 1996. in fact the european union and others, including canada, australia, norway, japan and south korea have now imposed their own sanctions. virtually every western energy company has now agreed to cease sales of refined petroleum to iran and refrain from investments in iran's energy sector. following the passage, most banks in the united arab emirates, an portrayeding partner, stopped money transfers to iran. press reports have indicated sanctions have cut in half exports with dubai. south korean sanctions have suspended the iran bank in seoul. the bank is a known facilitator of iran's proliferation activities and south korea is iran's fourth largest trading parter. the impact is significant. based on our discussion with the korean government. the banks's operations have been shut down for good. japan have recently announced sanctions that target iranian entities and individuals of proliferation concern, including iranian banks, the islamic revolutionary guard corps and the iranian shipping lines. these sanctions, along with the prohibition on the transfer of proliferation-sensitive d
, canada, australia have undergone very significant reorganizations in the way they have overseen, leased, regulated, enforced safety and environmental protection in the offshore environment. did you look before you made some of your own proposals? it is unfair to ask a cabinet officer to talk about how seriously you might have considered moving something outside your own agency but has that come up? as the administration been involved in making judgments about proposals made by the former secretary and others about the functions and revenue raising and that they do not belong in the same department with the regulatory enterprises? that is a long list and i will hope that we get through a big -- a good bit of it. i would invite you to respond to any or as much of it as we can get through. >> absolutely, let me just say that there is no question that you should not ask me. you should ask about things we have done and things we will do in the future. those are all good questions that u.s.. with respect to the cultural mms, there is a clear statement i made when i hired and appointed with th
of their american parent for their entire childhood. canada, the united kingdom, have all asked japan on returning their abducted children. children japan's inaction on the issue is a thorn in the side of their relations with the entire international community. japan's current inaction violates their duties under the international covet on civil and political rights, article 23, to completely and unjustly ignore the equal rights of one parent. h.res. 1326 calls on japan to immediately and urgently establish a process for the resolution of abduction an wrongful retention of american children. japan must find the will to establish today a process that will justify and equitablely end the cruel separation currently endured by parent and children alike. h.res. 1326 also calls on japan to join the hague convention on the civil aspects of international child abduction. this convention sets out the international norms for resolution of abduction and wrongful retention cases and will create a framework to quickly resolve future cases and act as a deterrent to parents who now feel that they can abduct thei
, canada, japan, south korea, norway have all taken a similar the robust approach. under the leadership of those countries it is crucial that others who follow will now look to their precedent. there's a strong and growing international consensus to hold them accountable for their actions. meanwhile, the united states has taken several actions of our own this summer, as indicated, adding substantially to its sanctions program that was already the most rigorous in the world. since the adoption of 1929, we have targeted more than 50 additional entities. bank said, -- banks, irgc officers. we identified several which have names that obscure the affiliation thus aiding companies around the world. congress gave us another powerful tool by passing the comprehensive iran sanctions act. it forces a stark choice. if you conduct certain business with them, you cannot do business with the united states. it contains significant sanctions on companies that assist iran in acquiring refined petroleum products. and also requires the treasury to prohibit or impose strict provisions on any foreign bank t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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